coffeefloatnescafe

It seems I’m the only one in the family who would pick up a Nescafe 3-in-1 coffee sachet like its the last thing on earth I would do. I’m exaggerating but that opening statement describes my dislike for any commercialized 3-in-1 coffee. I don’t know how many of those Nescafe 3-in-1 sachets my family consumes every month. 2% of the time I would drink it if my options for getting a hot drink at home was lesser.

Next to powdered flavor fruit drink and soft drinks (another term for soda here), it’s probably the most popular staple drink in the Philippines. I remember when my Canadian ex-boyfriend first came here to the Philippines he was always asking for brewed coffee at some budget inns he stayed in. I wasn’t a fan of instant coffee either but it was irritating hearing his complaints about the not so locally popular brewed coffee day by day.

The ingredients listed at the back of an instant coffee sachet is enough deterrent for me. Instant coffee is too sweet and more than once I swear I could taste some corn-ish stuff in it. I don’t know what ingredient gives it that corn-ish taste for me. However, I have tried the Nescafe 3-in-1 coffee in Malaysia in the same packaging but it had less sugary taste compared to its Philippine version. It’s probably because of Malaysia’s halal dietary laws.

I do love the coffee float at McDonald’s though. They use brewed Arabica coffee topped with soft serve sundae and a bit of chocolate fudge in it. I don’t know what’s worst ingredient-wise – the instant coffee or the coffee float. For me coffee float redeems itself by using brewed Arabica coffee and despite the mix of sundae and chocolate fudge, the taste of Arabica overpowers both. I have tasted hot brewed Arabica coffee by itself but it’s too strong for me it keeps me lucid for more than 12 hours after ingesting it.

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