It doesn’t hurt that part of my freelance work involves Twitter and I’ve gotten hooked reading about current events and posts about politics on the micro-blogger platform since I quit Facebook last year. One day my curiosity brought me to unfamiliar territory and even though part of me felt I wasted so much time that day, I did take away a valuable lesson about cyberbullies.

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Image courtesy of: Thoughtrepostrepository

What surprised me clicking through various Twitter profiles was how it became clearer that all of the notorious basher accounts do not have display pictures on their profile that’s uniquely theirs, i.e., their own profile picture. I don’t have a problem with critical thinkers hiding behind a different identity but what gives me pause is their intention to malign. Does this kind of anonymity make them feel entitled to lambaste known personalities? It sure does seem that way to me.

My hat goes off to a number of people I follow that are brave enough to critique presidents and other government officials and still show their authentic faces via their display picture. On the other end of the spectrum are faceless users with copied avatars spreading negativity. It’s one thing to criticize, it’s another to malign. Some cyberbullies I encountered that day feel braver with the latter.

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